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Aeration

You rip your drive down the first fairway, you have a wedge in which you proceed to knock 15 feet from the pin; birdie is almost certain, that is until you get to the green and find out they have just been aerated. While many individual rounds have been ruined by having to play on aerated greens, the process is necessary to keep greens in optimal conditions throughout the year.

Green Aeration is an extremely important maintenance practice that needs to be performed. Although it results in usually temporary disruption of the green, aeration improves the ability for water and fertilizers to get into the soil of the green by reducing soil compaction, stimulates grass root growth for healthier grass, helps control thatch build-up(a layer of organic material below the surface of the green that has died), and improves overall growing conditions. Aeration is usually performed once or twice per year, and in the New England area, is usually performed one in the spring and once in late summer or fall.


Over time a putting green or any normal lawn will compact itself. A compact ground not only tends to cause thatch build up but also greatly reduces the amount of air and nutrients that are able to enter the ground. With less nutrients to feed on and a harder ground to get through, grass roots have a hard time growing and often the grass itself turns into an ugly brownish-yellow color ultimately provoking thinning of the grass .

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Compaction is not only provoked from walking and mowing on your lawn, but also by rain and irrigation. Compaction occurs primarily in the 1" to 1-1/2" of the soil surface. Aeration can prevent or solve compaction and thatch build up. By using an aerator holes are created in the soil, allowing a better passage of air, water and nutrients while leaving minimum damage on the ground surface.

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The holes created by the aerator blades should naturally fill in within 10-12 days but the ground will have regained the needed nutrients allowing for the grass roots to grow stronger and deeper.








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